Creative Advertising Concepts

A series of hand-sketch advertising concepts created for various products and services.

XXXX Free-Alcohol Beer

Drinking is an excitedly sophisticated habit because not everyone really enjoys the bitter taste or being tipsy. People drink because of peer pressure, because of the ability to release stress (it makes you feel more stressed afterward indeed) or lower inhibition (so you can be brave enough to talk to your crush). To change such habit will require a very gradual and not so sudden process because first, people drink because of various and somehow clumsy reasons as mentioned, and second, because our target audience is the most stubborn demographic. 18-30, you are young, active, and very self centered. You don’t want to be told what to do obviously.
So after all, in order to change the proud habit bringing people together which XXXX has spent millions dollar to advertise over the years, we needed to find something that is equally desired regardless who you are. And we did find something that shares very similar traditions with XXXX, in a certain way.
As I’ve been emphasizing from the beginning, drinking is a stubborn habit that you can barely change it in anyway. So although we started with the image of the bottle cap, we wanted to drive the audience away from the drinking concept completely (because we are confident that they will and still can find a way to come back after all). So interestingly, the image of the bottle cap and the image of you-know-what are not only visually similar but also very comparable: they are made to be easily opened, they are made for one time use, and foremost, they are generally associated with men. Moreover, it puts audience into a very similar situation where they have to debate themselves on buying it or not. Obviously, no one goes out buying with the head held high even though it is supposed to be a right thing to do. And it is exactly the case with the XXXX Zero where there’s more to do with an emotional resistant rather than a rational one. And last but not least, this is a very down to earth approach because what else can be more appealing to this type of audience rather than sports – in which James has just presented and, I’ll give you a hint, it starts with S.

*****

Salsas Burrito
With Vege Burrito described as a bad guy in a walk-through guide book of a video game, the ad delivers a two-way message: eating this burrito to experience an exciting Mexico; and winning a trip to Mexico to taste this amazing food. A simple task of eating (and registering) for the loyalty card explained in an overlydetailed manner will help to capture audience’s attentions and give more credit towards those activities that people normally don’t take much seriousness in. The whole campaign “Prepare for the Taste (Trip)” will be executed with different “characters” and Mexico destinations in order to promote both equally.

*****

Samsung Galaxy Tab
Firstly, while following Samsung’s tradition of cheekily using others to show their own differences, the ad recreates a familiar purchasing experience (comparing specs between options) in
the boldest and most confident fashion (compared with itself). Secondly, it highlights the advantages of a B2B device in which multiple purchases and consistent appearances are all satisfied (2 same tablets showing in the ad). Lastly, it cleverly engages audience in small a game (that is almost impossible to solve) to deliver the idea of a device that is capable of withstanding heavy impacts under different working conditions.

*****

Sugar Free
The ad taps into the thrill and adrenaline rush of sports that people love, in an extreme scale. The image of a bungee jumping person along with the tagline Sugar High equates eating lollies with adrenaline. While with the character diving in a pool of lollies (instead of water) suggests a pure imagined scenario than actual sport activities, the implication is that this “high” taste is capable of generating enough inspiration for even widest physical feat. Being intentionally delivered in a comical style, the ad re-emphasizes the notion of a fun and consequence free experience – much like eating lollies themselves.

*****

Sugar Free
In order to target a health conscious demographic who has more reasons to not consume sweet than just taste, the ad reintroduces a somewhat childish “sweet tooth” myth. Putting
a not-so-bad image on consuming sweet (to treat your sweet tooth), the ad lets viewers to have an “excuse” to think of WOW, even for a short moment, before getting concerned about health issues. While with a clean and transparent visual style (nothing to hide – all about lollies) that is preferable in health related magazines, the idea of lollies-forming-body also makes the audience relatable in terms of caring for their bodies.

*****

AAMI Flexi Premium
To improve the current fairly absurd comparison and weak connection with audience, the new concept seeks to appeal to a wider demographic using analogy to common household
activities. With an upbeat tempo music and unchanged routine in the morning scene, the ad firstly creates the idea of a reliable repeated “purchase” before suggesting the element of unexpected. Delivering the “flushing the toilet means everything should go down” in a less visual striking manner (to avoid current ad’s ill-fitting narrative) along with the last scene when the water level rises up, will help to keep AAMI’s tradition of being cheeky and exaggerated.

*****

Habitat for Human
The ad is a typical family scene occurring every morning, and something people normally take for granted. The image of an undamaged car (an untrue notion of moving forward) and the
half-wrecked house form a sharp contrast and suggest a mere fantasy where people don’t get to live out this simple ritual. The uncertainty in expressions and gestures of the characters give
out a hyperbole message leading audience to continue reading body text. Overall, the ad is delivered in a serious fashion with a subtle touch of humour so that it creates a “bitter-sweet” scenario where viewers are urged to feel the guilt and the need to act.

*****

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